Challenges

Adding challenges to our summer reading program is a key factor in the positive results.

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Kids Read Now keeps students and parents motivated with challenges at each step of the program.

 

We challenge students to pick the books they want to read in the spring, and then to keep reading each week in the summer. We also challenge parents to read with their students and to discuss the reading comprehension questions on the Discovery Sheet inside each book.

Kids Read Now provides discovery sheets to guide reading comprehension.

 

Every book we ship has a custom designed Discovery Sheet inside the front cover. It has room for your child to put his/her name as the proud owner of the book.

 

It has four questions that will help the child better understand the book and improve their reading ability. Review at least one question of the four with your child each time you read, or re-read the book. Most can be answered by talking about them or drawing a picture. Upper-level books have written exercises that match what is being taught in 3rd grade to become a stronger reader.

Educators LOVE Kids Read Now!

Nearly 90% of educators who have used the program would recommend the program to other school districts.

Read more about the pillars behind our successful summer reading program.

Choices

 

Empower participating families with choices throughout the program.

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Rewards

 

Entice students to read with rewards and incentives.

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Parental Engagement

 

Keep parents engaged throughout the program with weekly outreach.

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Results

 

See results. Kids Read Now collects, analyzes, and shares data at each stage of the program.

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Transform your summer
reading program

 

Kids Read Now keeps your students passionate and engaged through the summer months. Request more information about how book choice shapes.

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