By Laura Bemus | Categories All | Curriculum | Educators | Funding | K-5 Literacy | Learning Loss | Results | October 23, 2020

How are Title I funds spent in your school district? This is a question that should be revisited and examined each year. Often educators are overwhelmed with the many requirements of spending Title I funds and the never-ending sales pitches for programs that can best utilize the money. The easiest decision is to continue to spend the grant money the same way that it has been spent in the past.

When revisiting the purpose of Title I, Part A – Improving basic Programs, the money is provided as supplemental funding to state and Local Education Agencies (LEA’s). The funding specifically provides resources to LEAs and schools with high percentages of students from low-income families. Title I resources are intended to improve education quality and help ensure that all children meet challenging state academic standards with a focus on students that are most at risk of failing.

If you continue to spend Title I funds the same each year, please stop and reflect on these questions: Is there research to support that decision? Are there results or improvements in student’s literacy skills that are documented with data? Are students better prepared to succeed in high school and beyond? It’s also the year that you should ask if a change in spending Title I funds should occur due to the many changes that have taken place in educating students during the pandemic.

Title I funding offers substantial assistance in providing best practices in literacy instruction and improvement. Educators know that improvement of students’ reading skills is at the core of reaching the desired outcomes and improvements for at risk students. Teacher and student days are packed full, especially with remote and hybrid learning options that educators are now facing with the pandemic.

A proven way to gain time is to engage students throughout the summer. Kids Read Now extends the school year to close the learning gap that exists for students living in poverty, engages parents and family with a result proven strategy. Kids Read Now is eligible for use of Title I funds. In fact, it’s a great choice with proven results through independent research. Now is the perfect time to engage students through the summer, while limiting in person contact, using summer downtime to provide literacy support that is turnkey, data-driven and offers real time student analytics.

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By Leib Lurie | Categories All | Book Deserts | Curriculum | Early Education | Educators | Equity | Funding | K-5 Literacy | Learning Loss | Opportunity Gap | Results | Summer Reading | October 16, 2020

We call it the “achievement gap” – but isn’t it really an opportunity gap? A closer look at socioeconomic reading disparities — and how we can help your child to close the gap

opportunity gap
A gap of .8 means a testing gap of 3 years

For decades, efforts to reduce the racial divide on test scores has relied on federal funding to supplement efforts to boost scores among minority students, and this has seen results.

However, regardless of race, the fact is that rich and poor Americans are living, learning, and raising children in increasingly separate and unequal worlds. The income gap is huge, has not narrowed in 50 years, and leads to a large gap in test scores. For high school children, this gap averages four years between students from the highest 10% and lowest 10% income levels.

The gap starts in kindergarten and continues to widen through the eighth grade. Generally called the achievement gap, it is really an OPPORTUNITY GAP.

Students in poverty generally have fewer opportunities to succeed. They are less likely to have two parents at home; their parents are less likely to have a higher education. Children living in poverty generally attend schools with less experienced teachers, are less likely to have books in the home, and are more likely to have food insecurity and home life disruptions. Every one of these opportunity gaps have been shown to hurt learning progress and outcomes.

Two other situations slow down learning progress.

Ubiquitous learning loss experienced by low-income students over the summer

Recent analysis of reading tests given to most low-income students finds that learning loss over the summer varies dramatically. Our experience at Kids Read Now confirms this. Kids, regardless of race, income, or English language proficiency at home, can and do achieve markedly higher learning gains over the summer when parents are engaged, ensure kids read the books that they choose and we provide, and set time to discuss those books.

Talking about books, using the Discovery Sheets inside every book we mail boosts skills significantly. Each Discovery Sheet has questions and activities specifically written for the book. They ask kids to compare what they read with other knowledge they have and different characters they know (text-to-text and text-to-world), to discuss their feelings and experiences (text-to-self), and to go beyond the covers to write and draw stories that spring from the book to the world beyond (imagination/creativity).

Independent research shows that for less than 10 cents a day, kids in our program increase reading scores by 1-2 months over summer. The COVID-19 extended out-of-school time and difficulties with remote learning make this type of mailed reading intervention even more critical.

Rapidly growing dependency on screen time replacing reading time

Tweens spend 5-6 hours a day on screens and teens 7 hours or more on screens. We endorse a simple helper here: #ClickCaptionsON! is a great way for students in 4th grade and beyond to continue reading via captions while absorbing screen content. A dozen studies have shown this will build their reading abilities. Watching a show with captions on for just 30 minutes is the equivalent of reading 30 pages of a 5th grade book.

Closing the opportunity gap begins by having schools using parents as viable, valuable learning resources. Building and focusing on parental engagement processes are proven to work. These “parent training interventions” cost far less than traditional intervention programs that have not narrowed the gap in 50 years.

For more information, contact us.

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By KRN Admin | Categories All | Curriculum | Early Education | Educators | K-5 Literacy | Reading | Results | October 14, 2020

If you have a young reader in your house, you may have heard different terms like Lexile, Developmental Reading Assessment, Accelerated Reader, and others. These terms and more are used to determine the reading levels of books.

 

But what exactly do they mean? How do we know that if a child can read a book on one level they can also independently tackle another level? The different reading levels can quickly become overwhelming, but don’t worry! We’ve got you covered.

 

Generally, teachers will perform several reading assessments with students over the course of the school year. These assessments determine their reading level which will help guide their choices when selecting books.

 

Typically, these reading levels are also used to categorize books in school libraries; therefore, the child can easily select books for themselves from that particular section. It’s important to understand that these assessments aren’t meant to restrict your child, but to determine the best way to help them progress as a reader.

 

Always encourage your child to read books on their level and to try more advanced titles. Stretching their comprehension skills will help them progress through the different levels.

 

There are a number of different ways that books are assessed. Here are some of the most popular methods and their explanations.

Common Reading Level Assessments

Accelerated Reader (AR) ATOS Level: AR is a computer program that helps teachers manage a student’s independent reading practice. The child picks a book read at their own pace. When finished reading, the student takes a comprehension quiz on the computer and receives points and feedback based on the quiz results.

 

Children select their own books to read instead of having one assigned to them, which gives them a sense of control and makes reading a more enjoyable experience.

 

F&P Text Level Gradient: Fountas and Pinnell Reading Levels are not solely based on the child’s skill levels. Instead, books are classified according to various factors such as word count, number of different words, high-frequency words, sentence length and complexity, word repetitions, illustration support, etc.

 

While students tend to have a wide range of reading comprehension skills at a young age, each reading level is associated with the school grade level in which the child belongs.

 

For example, kindergarten students read books on the A, B, C, or D levels; first-grade students read on E-J levels, and so on.

 

Developmental Reading Assessment (DRA): With DRA, each student’s reading level is based on an evaluation of three components: reading engagement, oral reading fluency, and comprehension.

 

The assessment is a combination of oral retelling, written comprehension responses, and overall student engagement. Once complete, teachers use the DRA Continuum to assess each student and select learning activities according to their skill set.

 

The Lexile Framework: The Lexile Framework is a popular system used to measure a student’s reading ability and level books on text complexity. When measuring both of these components, educators can “forecast” the success the reader will have with that book.

 

Even across the different level assessments, it’s important to note these indicators are meant to help your child – not restrict them. If you have any questions about how your child’s reading levels can be improved or wish to learn more about our program, reach out to us at info@kidsreadnow.org.

 

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By Leib Lurie | Categories All | Challenges | Critical Thinking | Curriculum | Early Education | Educators | Engagement - Classroom | Engagement - Family | K-5 Literacy | Learning Loss | Listening | Opportunity Gap | Parents | Reading | Reading Instruction | Results | Social Emotional Learning | Summer Reading | September 4, 2020

Every book we mail home has a book-specific “Discovery Sheet” on the inside front cover.

PARENT TIP: For books you get from other places, you can help build reading skills by making up questions or activities like these and talk about EVERY BOOK when your child finishes reading it.

It has room for your child to write in his/her name as the proud owner of the book. Pride in book ownership is a crucial first step on the path to loving reading.

Each sticker has four activities that will help your child better understand the book and improves their reading comprehension. These are written at the reading level of the book, so kids can read them easily. Some questions suggest working on an activity and/or discussing with a parent. Questions in Read-To-Me books are designed to be done with a parent. Most can be answered by talking about them or drawing a picture. Upper-level books have fun or challenging activities that match what is being taught in class to become a stronger reader.

Typically, each sheet includes the following four categories which work together to help a child better understand the book. To think how it fits into what they have read elsewhere, already know about themselves, compare with other books or shows, and use their imagination or creativity. For example:

Text to Self:

Text-to-self connections are highly personal connections that a student makes between parts of this book and their own experiences or life. For example, “What are some of the ways these animals take care of their babies, and how is this like how your mom takes care of you?

Text to Text:

Sometimes students are reminded of other things that they have read; other books by the same author, stories from a similar genre, or perhaps on the same topic. For example, “Pick two animals in this book. How do they take care of their babies? How are they the same? Or, different?

Text to World:

Text-to-world connections are the larger connections that a student brings to this book. We learn about things through school, teachers, parents, television and videos. For example, “What would happen to most of these animals if their parents did not take care of them?” or “Have you seen a program on television that talked about animal babies? How was it the same or different from this book?” Keep asking your child to talk more about it. The more they talk about what they have seen, the more they will learn and internalize it.

Creativity / Imagination:

This activity might ask your child to do something creative, such as draw a picture, draft a letter to the author, or imagine what might happen in a sequel to this book.

Always encourage longer explanations:

Brainstorm with them! Look up new facts, make up a play, or perform a puppet show about the story.

Ask your child to use new words they may have learned in this book.

Talking more about books helps make children better readers!

ELL FAMILIES

The Kids Read Now app (iOS | Android) helps foreign language-speaking parents better help their children. The Discovery Sheet activities can be viewed in over 150 languages.

Click here for a sample Discovery Sheet

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By Christina Brownlee | Categories All | Book Deserts | Choices | Critical Thinking | Curriculum | Early Education | Educators | Engagement - Family | K-5 Literacy | Learning Loss | Opportunity Gap | Results | August 14, 2020

Exciting innovations in technology have wildly evolved over the last decade. You can hold the universe in the palm of your hand, view high-definition videos with lightning speed, and connect with people all over the world with a simple tap on a screen. Pretty cool, right?

But what do these technological innovations mean for old-fashioned reading? Is technology taking over?

The answer is yes, but the benefits of reading do not decrease as technology booms. In fact, the benefits of reading become more important than ever before.

Screen time use by children, tweens, and teens has doubled in the last five years and continues to grow. Teens are connected to screens for videos, TV shows, movies, social media, video games, and more. Phones, tablets, laptops, and televisions are a huge part of their daily lives—so let’s use them for good, and fun.

Technology + Reading = Win

Did you know that 8 to 12-year-olds use around five hours of screen time per day while teens average around 7.5 hours per day? These averages don’t account for homework or learning time. Reading for fun decreases the older a child gets, especially if reading isn’t established as a daily habit.

Only six percent of Americans name reading as a favorite evening activity—the lowest Gallup has recorded in its trend. More and more families are spending time watching TV as a favorite evening routine, while reading is dropping considerably.

Technology is an excellent way to enhance learning by increasing the brain’s ability to assimilate and decode information. This juxtaposition between increases in screen time and decreases in reading time is cited as one reason for the literacy crisis in America, where less than 35% of students are proficient readers.

There is a way to reverse both disparate trends. Make screen time reading time by simply turning on the closed captions. Every 30 minutes of screen time equals reading 30 pages of a book!

So how does Kids Read Now help?

When most people think of summer, they easily envision backyard barbecues, swimming pools, vacation, and long lazy days in the sun. When we think about summer, we think about the dreaded summer slide and how it disproportionately affects disadvantaged students.

Over summer, a divide plagues those from lower income families and places them at a sharp disadvantage in obtaining books or accessing online learning tools. Our reading programs are the easiest way to deliver high-quality, reading-range-ready books to kids at their home address—no technology needed! So, crack open that book to create a healthy, lifelong habit and turn on closed captions whenever you can!

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By KRN Admin | Categories All | Challenges | Choices | Critical Thinking | Curriculum | Early Education | Educators | Engagement - Family | K-5 Literacy | Learning Loss | Opportunity Gap | Parents | Reading | Reading Instruction | Results | Summer Reading | July 1, 2020

Summer Reading Slide : Summer Reading Program for K-3

The Summer Slide: Summer is a time for relaxation, sunshine, vacations, and… reading loss?

It’s estimated that a child loses two months of learning each summer, which accumulates each year, totaling almost two years of learning loss by the time they graduate high school.

This epidemic of the summer slide widely impacts all children, but more specifically those in disadvantaged and low-income families. Kids Read Now has made it our mission to combat the summer slide through a proven, in-home summer reading program.

Summer Reading Slide : Summer Reading Program

 

More about the importance of summer reading

Summer reading isn’t just about diverting their eyes from a screen to a book; it’s about keeping children’s minds ready to retain critical information. Even more so, studies show that summer reading bridges the achievement gap between the economic status of advantaged and disadvantaged children.

When schools close for the summer, reading opportunities diminish, especially for economically disadvantaged students without access to books. Some students live in book deserts, and without the oasis of an accessible home library will fall victim to the summer slide and widen the achievement gap.

This gap has a cumulative effect as students develop and progress academically and can account for significant increases in high school dropout rates and decreases in four-year college attendance.

From kindergarten to third grade, children learn to read. From fourth grade forward, children read to learn. Children who aren’t reading at grade level by the fourth grade are at increased risk to endure social and financial hardships throughout their lives, such as higher dropout rates, poverty rates, and incarceration rates.

Reading encompasses a myriad of subjects: math, science, social skills, etc. When a child reads, they exercise imagination and creativity, and they learn essential social and life skills to help them as they grow.

What is KRN doing about The Summer Slide?

Kids Read Now isn’t an average reading program. The difference? Kids are in charge.

Studies have shown that reading programs are most effective when children have access to self-selected books. Children are more likely to read voluntarily when they are in charge of choosing the book and subject matter. It’s more exciting and provides the child with an element of control.

How the program works

Designed for K-3 students, the KRN summer program allows students to select books from a large and diverse library of educator-approved titles. These books are delivered directly to the students’ homes, and they get to keep them forever!

Each book delivery comes with questions to aid students in comprehension and help parents engage with their child’s reading. Students who report reading every book on their list receive a completion certificate, a reward, and a celebration in Fall.

Kids Read Now sends weekly reminder calls, texts, or emails to the parents encouraging them to engage and connect with their child about the book they are currently reading.

A new study on the program, led by Geoffrey D. Borman, Ph.D., at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, found that, “Results indicate that the impact of KRN can more than eradicate the entire two months of summer learning loss experienced by low-income students.”

In short, the KRN summer reading program is eliminating the summer reading slide for students across the country.

Summer reading is vital to the success of our children’s education. If you are interested in learning more about the program, please reach out to us. Let’s work together to bridge the achievement gap for all students and families!

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By KRN Admin | Categories All | Choices | Diversity | Early Education | Educators | Equity | Inclusion | K-5 Literacy | Opportunity Gap | Results | Social Emotional Learning | June 22, 2020

It’s in our nature to surround ourselves with those to whom we can relate the most; that’s no different for children. Here’s a list we’ve pulled together of some of our favorite books on inclusion, which you can include in your reading rotation.

Books are important visual tools for children and are some of the first items they interact with as they develop mentally, physically, and emotionally. Books are an exciting way to watch children connect the dots between what they read and experience.

Children should have access to books that they can relate to and see themselves as the main character in the book. Not only is this empowering for children, but it can help foster the feeling of inclusion.

The Importance of Inclusion in Children’s Books

By definition, inclusion is the simply the act of being included; however, sometimes parents may have some trouble finding fun and exciting children’s books that not only include their own children, but include children of different races, backgrounds, socioeconomic statuses, and family structures. Promoting empathy and respect for all types of diversity is essential to healthy relationships through childhood and adulthood.

It’s human nature to surround ourselves with those we can relate to most, and it’s no different for children. The more books in your home library with diverse characters and situations, the more your child will learn to embrace diversity and inclusivity.

If you are looking for books that include your children and the world around them, we’ve pulled together a list of our favorite inclusive books from our 2020 Wishlist that you can put in your reading rotation.

14 Books for Children About Inclusion

Who Was Jackie Robinson?

By: Gail Herman

Illustrated by John O’Brien

As a kid, he loved sports. In 1947 Jackie joined the Brooklyn Dodgers, breaking the long time color barrier. Some of the fans didn’t like it. Some of his teammates didn’t like it. His story is as inspiring as he was. 112pgs

Who Was Jackie Robinson?

Beautiful / Bellas

By: Stacy McAnulty

Illustrated by Joanne Lew-Vriethoff

Every girl is special. Every girl is talented. Every girl is beautiful! 32pgs

Beautiful / Bellas

The Dot

By: Peter H. Reynolds

Illustrated by Peter H. Reynolds

Can you draw? Vashti thinks she can’t. But oh, what a surprise! 32pgs

The Dot

Don’t Throw it to Mo!

By: David A. Adler

Illustrated by Sam Ricks

Mo loves to play football! But, he’s not very good at it. He’s small, and has trouble catching the ball. Can he help his team win? 32pgs

Don't Throw it to Mo!

Brave / Valiente

By: Stacy McAnulty

Illustrated by Joanne Lew-Vriethoff

Being brave isn’t just for superheroes. We can all be brave! 32pgs

Brave / Valiente

I Love Our Earth / Amo nuestra Tierra

By: Bill Martin Jr., Michael Sampson

Illustrated by Dan Lipow

Our Earth is one of a kind. Let’s celebrate her colors, climates, and seasons! 32pgs

I Love Our Earth / Amo nuestra Tierra

I Want to Be a Doctor

By: Laura Driscoll

Illustrated by Catalina Echeverri

When Jack hurts his foot, his family takes him to the hospital. There he meets all sorts of doctors: bone doctors, eye doctors, baby doctors. How many different kinds of doctors are there? 32pgs

I Want to Be a Doctor

Something Beautiful

By: Sharon Dennis Wyeth

Illustrated by Chris K. Soentpiet

A little girl lives in a scary neighborhood. Instead of seeing the scary things, she decides to look for the beautiful things. What are the beautiful things in your world?

32pgs

Something Beautiful

Dancing in the Wings

By: Debbie Allen

Illustrated by Kador Nelson

In dance, sometimes it’s important to blend in with everyone else. Sometimes it’s important to stand out. Has Sassy made the right choices? 32pgs

Dancing in the Wings

Alvin Ho: Allergic to the Great Wall, Forbidden Palace, and other Tourist Attractions

By: Lenore Look

Illustrated by LeUyen Pham

Alvin is afraid of everything. But in this book, he’s taking his fears to a whole new level. Or should we say, continent? 176pgs

Alvin Ho: Allergic to the Great Wall, Forbidden Palace, and other Tourist Attractions

MTH #18: Buffalo Before Breakfast

By: Mary Pope Osborne

Illustrated by Sal Murdocca

Annie and Jack travel to the American plains, and visit a tribe named Lakota. When they meet up with a herd of bison, will they be safe? 96pgs

MTH #18: Buffalo Before Breakfast

Bud, Not Buddy

By: Christopher Paul Curtis

In 1936 Flint, Michigan, life is hard for motherless Bud Caldwell. His mother never told him who his father was, but she left a few clues. Once Bud begins his search for his father, nothing can stop him. 288pgs

Bud, Not Buddy

Who Was Harriet Tubman?

By: Yona Zeldis McDonough

Illustrated by Nancy Harrison

Harriet was born a slave, but grew into a brave and daring young woman. She was brave enough to escape from slavery and daring enough to help others escape, too. 112pgs

Who Was Harriet Tubman?

Who Was Sacagawea?

By: Judith Bloom Fradin, Dennis Brindell Fradin

Illustrated by Val Paul Taylor

Sacagawea is best known for helping the Lewis and Clark expedition map the Louisiana Territory and find a passage to the Pacific Ocean. But she was so much more! Read all about her amazing trip!

112pgs

Who Was Sacagawea?

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By Christina Brownlee | Categories All | Challenges | Choices | Curriculum | Early Education | Educators | Engagement - Community | Engagement - Family | Equity | K-5 Literacy | Learning Loss | News | Opportunity Gap | Reading | Reading Instruction | Results | March 23, 2020

by: Aliah Williamson, WDTN NEWS

Link to the original post

TROY, Ohio (WDTN) – Every summer since 2012, the Kids Read Now organization sends books to 130 different school districts to combat “summer slide” or learning loss.

This year, as the coronavirus shut down could potentially keep kids out of school for at least 5 months, there are tens of thousands of students facing new challenges.

Leib Lurie, the founder of Kids Read Now based in Troy, says economically disadvantaged students are more vulnerable when it comes to learning loss especially during the shutdown.

“Just over half of poor households have no highspeed internet connection and only 30 [to] 40 percent only have a phone,” said Lurie. “We have a lot of parents struggling just to keep their kids fed…”

In response, the nonprofit is ramping up its program early for “Spring Fling.” Schools can enroll in the program and help their students pick a wishlist of books for the summer.

The books each come with Discovery Sheets to help students with reading comprehension. When a student is finished with a book, they text a code to a number and the next book in the queue is sent.

Lurie says more than 10,000 students are already signed up.

“We’re going to ship probably close to 600,000 books in the next eight or ten-weeks. Typically nine books reduce the summer reading slide by 27 days or 2 1/2 months of school days. Six hundred thousand books are going to get a lot of kids doing a whole lot of reading,” said Lurie.

Sending books on such a large scale does come at a cost, but it’s a price that Lurie is prepared to pay to see students succeed.

“Our mission is to improve literacy outcomes for children. So if we have to put another $1 million of cost into this to keep it going we’re going to do that,” said Lurie.

Kids Read Now is looking for volunteers as well as donations to keep their program afloat.

For more information on how you could help out click here.

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By | Categories Educators | October 20, 2018

Much of our current educational system maintains the late 19th- and early 20th-century methods that build it. At that time, students learned the basics, preparing them for urban life which translated into a job in a factory. The industrial model became more efficient by standardization, which then emerged in the schools. Better students became better workers and citizens. This common goal meant that all students were taught the same thing in the same way.

Today we are faced with a new revolution, one where massive amounts of data are becoming the key feature. This flood of data is improving the industry in ways that the people of the early 20th century could not dream. It is leading to the personalization of many sectors, with Netflix and Amazon being two significant examples. Both of these platforms utilize data from the people using them to customize their experiences. Such data collection now affects every aspect of life in the 21st century, including education.

With computers being used more and more frequently in the classroom, it is becoming more feasible to gather data about how students learn best. This data comes from both the programs the students are interacting with and the observations of teachers in the classroom. Many educational management systems, like Google Classroom and Blackboard, allow teachers to see how often students communicate. Other programs adapt to what students are learning, and how fast they are learning the subject matter.

These technologies provide data that educators can use. This data can be recorded, stored, and used by teachers in future classes to develop plans that adapt to student learning needs. Not only can they adapt to the pace, but they can also adapt to topics that students find more engaging. On a larger scale, districts can use this information to see what curriculum is effective, and what is not. This can help them keep what the students are learning more relevant, and therefore keep them more engaged.

On a larger scale, data collection improves when students learn. There is an experiment going on in California right now that pushes the edges of how data can impact student learning. Information gathers via through Fitbits, cameras, and a variety of other tracking mechanisms and uploaded to a cloud. There, engineers access the data, analyze it, and report it back to the school. Should we teach math before or after lunch? How can we address the restlessness in class that happens at 10 AM every day? These are questions they are trying to solve to see if they can create the ultimate in customization of the educational experience.

Gathering information plays a big part in the Kids Read Now program. The data we collect helps districts see who is participating during the summer, what they are reading, and how that reading affects their test scores. What we have provided shows the impact of our program over time on students and on their ability to read.

The amount of data in a classroom is vast. Utilizing data to improve educational outcomes is being explored at the dawn of the 21st century. Much like industry affected the 20th-century class, data and customization are impacting education in the 21st century. Not only will the collection and customization of data improve state and federal educational metrics, these processes also will optimize the learning experiences for students. The information is all there, just waiting for schools to use.


By KRN Admin | Categories Educators | Funding | October 5, 2018

Educators can be incredibly creative when it comes to learning activities. The ideas that flow from passionate teachers can have some significant impacts on education. The KIPP program is one of those ideas, as is 826 National out of California. The Freedom Writers Foundation is another group that developed from one teacher’s desire to make her students better readers and writers. Other than driven by passionate educators, these programs have one other thing in common – their initial funding came from the teachers themselves.

It may be shocking for some to hear this, but it is not uncommon. In a recent study, it was discovered that over 94% of teachers dip into their own funds for school supplies. Schools have been hit hard in recent years by budget cuts, making it even more difficult for school districts to fund programs to help students. Fortunately other sources exist, offered by government entities and non-profits.

Grants are available to help schools fill the gaps in their budgets, allowing them to maintain existing programs or establish new ones. They are widely available to fund an array of programs, but they are not easy to obtain. As money dries up from state and federal governments, there is more and more competition for grants. With competition being as high as it is, there are a few things you should consider:

 

Winning grants is something that will take time and energy to achieve. It takes practice to write grants and a certain level of skill to win them know. But they are worth looking into as a way to bring programs to the school that will help your students. They can jumpstart a program that can improve the education of students through the district. Teachers spend a great deal of their own time and money helping students. By bringing more grant money into the school district, these efforts can be amplified into a lasting piece of your educational endeavors.