By Shannon Anderson | Categories All | Authors | Blog | Choices | Educators | Engagement | Games | Literacy | Reading | Reading instruction | July 15, 2021

How do you get kids excited about books? Over my 25 years of teaching, I’ve discovered many ways to spark excitement. Here are 10 to get you started:

  1. Start an After-School Book Club

Invite a guest reader from the community to kick off the meetings. After the read-aloud, the kids spread out to read independently or with a friend. You can also invite a high school sport team or club to buddy read with the kids.

  1. Be a “Book Fairy”

Use your points from Scholastic book clubs or grants to gift books to kids. Try to give every student a book by the end of the year. Kids love the surprise and owning their own book is more special than borrowing, so they treasure it.

  1. Invite Guest Leaders as Readers

Leaders in schools and the community love to be a part of this and your students will be inspired to see what some of their role models read. Invite the football coach, the mayor, chief of police, a local veterinarian, and others to share a favorite book.

  1. Encourage Kid-Created Contagious Book Reviews

When a student reads a book they love, have them create a book review to share with the class. You can do these live, or have kids create a video. You can even take the videos, create a QR code for them, and adhere the QR code inside the cover of the books!

  1. Hold a Reading Marathon

The day of the “marathon,” have kids wear running gear, create paper running bibs, allow healthy snacks and water bottles, and read all day! Have kids read independently, in pairs, Zoom in guest readers and authors, and YOU should read aloud to them too.

  1. Kick off the Year with a Book Tasting Event

Use tablecloths and place settings and serve a pile of books on plates. Provide wish lists for your students to jot down the books they are interested in reading that year. This is a great way to get kids familiar with your classroom library and excited about what they get to read! (Use their lists to get ideas for book fairy visits too!)

  1. Host Book-Bartering Days

Kids bring in a book that they’re willing to part with in exchange for another book from someone in the classroom. Students give a 30 second pitch on what they loved about the book they’re offering. Arrange the books on tables and allow students to make their selections.

  1. Get Your Own Little Free Library

As a class, write a grant for a Little Free Library for your school. Your class will love this service project and visit it often! To fill the library, send home a request for gently used books as a donation to the Little Free Library. You will be surprised at how many books come in!

  1. Host Chat and Chews

Choose a book you have multiple copies of. You can make book marks with the dates for each meeting and what chapters need to be read each time. On assigned dates, enjoy your lunch and discuss the chapters of the book together!

  1. Have an Author Visit!

I may be biased, since I’m a children’s book author who LOVES to do author visits, but I truly believe in their power. Kids love to meet authors in person and have a renewed passion for reading and writing afterward. From hearing the story behind the stories, or special secrets the author shares, it is a memorable experience.

 

When kids see you make reading a priority and a treat to be enjoyed, they are on their way to becoming life-long readers.

By Shannon Anderson

Shannon Anderson has taught for 25 years, from first
grade through college level. The highlight of her career
was being named one of the Top 10 Teachers who
inspired the Today Show. Shannon is also an award-winning
children's book author of over a dozen books.
She served as the Regional Advisor for the Indiana
Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators and
also on the Indiana State Literacy Association Board of
Directors. Shannon loves to do author visits at schools
around the country and provide PD for teachers. You can
learn more about Shannon and her books by visiting her website. Make sure you follow Shannon on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, and YouTube.

Related Posts

Finding the Hook

August 27, 2021


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Categories