By KRN Admin | Categories Events | November 29, 2016

The period from Thanksgiving to New Years that inspires people to go out and perform kind acts for their community. According to a 2012 Guidestar survey, 50.5% of organizations claimed majority of their donations came during the fourth quarter of the year. As the year closes, people are far more generous than at any time of the year. People open their hearts more at this period of the year for many reasons: part of it is the spirit of giving, part of it is tax deductions for the end of the year. For whatever reason, charities and nonprofits benefit greatly from this season of giving. That is why #GivingTuesday, the day after the biggest shopping weekend of the year, is so perfectly placed. With the holidays and end of the year in front of us, there are plenty of ways you can help the charities in your community.

50.5% of organizations claimed majority of their donations came during the fourth quarter of the year.

The simplest way to help is to donate money. There are many fundraising sites out there that help you give with just a click of the mouse! We are partial to Razoo, who handles our charitable donations. Indiegogo, a very popular crowdfunding site for business, offers Generosity. It is their powerful tools put to use for charity. Charity Navigator is one of the largest fundraising sites for nonprofits. You can research the company you are going to donate to and then donate without leaving the website. All of these sites have a searchable index of charities they are working with, so you can aid your favorite cause. Of course, you can just surf over to your favorite local charity’s website and donate directly to them.

You can passively give just through shopping at individual stores. Kroger has their Community Rewards Program, which Kids Read Now (#16777) is a part of, and Amazon offers their Amazon Smile Program (which works with Prime!). If you are looking for a particular charity to donate to, many of them have become savvy and started their shops. (RED) has been around for a decade, partnering with a variety of major companies to create specialty products. Purchasing those products makes a donation to HIV/AIDS research. When 826 National found a retail space for their nonprofit to help children write, it was zoned retail. To use the space (and raise some cash), they created a pirate supply store. The model stuck and a superhero supply store was born a few years later.  

There is no need to have wealth to make a donation. One thing that every charity and nonprofit can use is the gift of your time. At Kids Read Now, Bonnie in the warehouse can always use some help organizing the hundreds of books we receive during the winter and ship out during the summer. Helping all of these eager readers keeps up on our toes! You can contact us at info@kidsreadnow.org, and we can work around your schedule. Other groups are seeing record numbers of food, clothes and toys coming through their door. They can also use help sorting and organize these generous gifts. VolunteerMatch is a website that helps match volunteers with the local nonprofit of their choice. It will provide a list of events where you can volunteer or some skills that they may need. Philanthropic groups need bookkeepers and marketers too!

No one has ever become poor by giving. ― Anne Frank

Do you have items laying around? Are you purging as you clean to get ready for guests, or to make room in the closed for more gifts? Many charities will accept those items, clean them up, and sell them as a means of revenue. You can donate everything from clothes to cars. Salvation Army and Goodwill are always willing to accept gently worn clothes, furniture, and other home goods. Goodwill even will take that car donation! Gifts to local charities and shelters are welcome as well, as many of them see more need during this time of year. Of course, if you are getting rid of any children’s books, those would be gratefully accepted. While Kids Read Now does not accept books as donations, we certainly encourage spreading the gift of reading!

No matter what you give to philanthropic pursuits, it is always greatly appreciated by those receiving it. The people receiving the donation are not the only ones that get a benefit; studies show many benefits from the individual who is donating! #GivingTuesday is an opportunity not just to give for the day, but to make a plan to volunteer for a group, set up monthly donations, or give gifts to the organizations making your community a better place. How will you help your community today?


By KRN Admin | Categories News | September 1, 2016

As we head into the Labor Day holiday, we pause and look at the impact of the American worker. Appearing at the end of the 19th century, laborers have spent the first Monday in September enjoying a well-earned day of rest. Productivity has steadily increased since the Bureau of Labor Statistics first started measuring the data in the 1950’s. Manufacturing has been returning to the United States over the last few years, and minimum wages have been increasing around the country to help low-income workers earn a better salary. Add a reasonable 4.9% unemployment rate to the mix, and the job picture in the United States is a rosy one. Our highly skilled and well-educated labor force plays into those impressive statistics. Labor and literacy have a special bond, especially as our economy hums forward in the Digital Age.

The world is moved along, not only by the mighty shoves of its heroes, but also by the aggregate of tiny pushes of each honest worker. -Helen Keller

Entering a workforce that increasingly uses data and technology can intimidate those with lower levels of literacy. Barriers workers have to scale to find a job start with reading the application. According to the Employment Policy Institute’s (EPI) 2010 data, over 27 million Americans do not have the reading skills needed to fill out an application. Computerized applications create another barrier to getting a job. Almost two-thirds of people at the two lowest levels of literacy are not familiar enough with a computer to input the necessary data.

The barriers are not just in the reading and comprehension of the application. The National Commission on Writing published a study titled “Writing: A Ticket to Work or a Ticket Out…”. Employers indicated that writing a weak resume or errors on an application was an instant rejection for many jobs. The study suggested that the stable, salaried jobs went to workers that proved they could read and write well. Hourly jobs required less reading and writing and went to lower-skilled employees. They are also much less stable. The unemployment rate for those with lower reading skills can be twice as high as those who can read.

When a job does open up for someone with below average literacy, they begin to experience other setbacks. They earn weekly than their better-educated peers. According to the 2002 “National Center for Education Statistics: Adult Literacy in America” report, workers at the lowest levels of literacy make $110 less per week than even average readers, and up to $450 less per week than the highest performing readers. They are employed less during the year, working only nineteen weeks.

The low wages reflect their inability to scale the corporate ladder to better paying managerial jobs. Jobs that require more reading, writing, and reporting than a minimum wage, minimum skill job. With the push for a higher minimum wage, employers will hire the candidates with the highest skills, driving some of those jobs further out of reach. Many occupations we consider to be low skilled require the ability to work a computer or read data. We have to prepare a workforce for the challenges of the increasingly knowledge-based economy.

The unemployment rate for those with lower reading skills can be twice as high as those who can read.

Kids Read Now has been celebrating the labor our students put in this summer to improve their reading skills. Investments we are making in their education now will pay off for them while they are in school.  Those same advantages will continue when they leave it to go into the workplace. Students that build their reading skills are laying the foundations to improve their future. Spend a little time on Labor Day relaxing with friends and family after all the work you have done for the year, put aside some time start that book you have wanted to read. You might find a child wants to sit down and read with you.


By KRN Admin | Categories Educators | August 16, 2016

“It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men. ” -Frederick Douglass

Literacy is a strong component when it comes to predicting the success of students. The earlier we build that foundation, the better off the student will be in the long run. Studies show that the end of third grade and beginning of fourth grade is a crucial time in a scholastic career. Children who are not proficient at reading by this point are four times as likely to drop out of school than their better-read peers. That is only if students compared exist on the same income level. Add the challenges of being from a low-income home, and those same students are thirteen times more likely to drop out. Students that drop out are much less liable to be employed and far more liable to end up using government resources like low-income housing, food stamps, and possibly correctional facilities.

For those who are at the lowest income levels, the challenges in school can be the least of their concerns. Their attendance can be inconsistent because of family needs or transportation issues. They are often undernourished, causing them to be distracted when they need to focus on lessons. Students at the lowest income levels may not be able to afford even the basics like pens, paper, or shoes. And families of poor students may not be able to offer educational support like helping with homework or attending school activities. This can be due to their work schedule or a lack of education themselves. Their lack of education perpetuates a cycle that keeps these families on the low end of the social and economic scale. At this end, the drop towards criminal activities is not too far.

“For those who are at the lowest income levels, the challenges in school can be the least of their concerns.”

There are strong ties between incarceration and having a poor education. Those relationships start with students not having a high school diploma, or equivalent, having a much more difficult time finding a job. High school graduates are almost twice as likely to find a job than a student that has dropped out. People who cannot read at an 8th-grade level have a more difficult time reading newspapers (most written at a 9th-grade level) to find jobs or even applying for jobs. When the option for growth become limited, many dropouts will turn to crime. Studies estimate that up to two in three inmates read at the lowest levels or are functionally illiterate. Recidivism is much higher for those who have not improved their reading as opposed to those that have. Seventy percent of poor readers will end up back in jail, as opposed to sixteen percent that read well.

We have the opportunity to help break this cycle by focusing on literacy early. Kids Read Now provides tools to help students embrace becoming better readers by giving them the books they want to read in the critical kindergarten through third-grade years. Parents are encouraged to participate by helping them read the books, answer the questions, and obtain the next book for their child. Through the efforts of the entire community, we can build readers at a young age that will become learners and leaders in the future.


By KRN Admin | Categories Educators | July 13, 2016

A few weeks ago, the Pittsburgh Penguins finished the NHL season with a Stanley Cup victory. A week after that, the Cleveland Cavaliers finished the NBA season by breaking a fifty-two year championship drought in Cleveland. Both teams did it in spectacular style, taking their respective series seven games and winning in the closing minutes of the match. You may think that they are just going to relax until the middle of September when training camps for both leagues start.

You would be wrong.

“Then they are going to start preparing for next season.”

The players on each team are certainly going to take a break from their grueling, nine-month seasons. They are going to spend time with their families, head to vacation, sleep in a little, and catch up on the things they missed during the season. Then they are going to start preparing for next season. They are going to spend some time in the gym. They are going to watch games from the last season so they can get better. Then incorporate those needs into practices from the middle part of July to the time they walk into training camp.

Children in school are no different. School is nine months of homework, studying, learning, and testing. Teachers and students look forward to the end of the year for a few weeks of relaxation. The difference is that teachers start looking over lessons, taking some remedial classes, and preparing for school a few weeks into the summer. It is rare for students, especially young students, to do the same thing. There are far too many pools to play in, woods to explore, and television shows to watch even to consider getting children to do some reading. This leads to what many educators and people who study education refer to as the “summer slide”. The National Summer Learning Association (NSLA) has started celebrating Summer Learning Day on July 14th to bring attention to a gap than can affect any student but more pronounced in lower-income students.

“There are far too many pools to play in, woods to explore, and television shows to watch even to consider getting children to do some reading.”

Like athletes resting too much in the off season, students who do not participate in learning can fall behind. It is a critical developmental time for children; third graders that fall behind in reading are four times more likely to drop out. Students who do nothing during the summer can lose up to three months of educational gains. It may not sound like much, but by fifth grade, some students may be two to three grades behind their peers. That is quite a bit to overcome, and they may not have a LeBron to lift them up.

That is why the NSLA encourages everyone to spend time with their child on July 14th for education. The time can be utilized in a variety of ways. You can sit down and read a book together or play educational games. Even a walk in the park or a trip to the store can be an opportunity to learn. If students do not have the support system available to them, reading a good book on that day can help. Especially if it is a book that piques the child’s interest. Developing healthy habits now pay off over the course of a student’s career. 

We encourage you to take part in National Summer Learning Day on July 14th. You can see what other communities are doing on social media be following the hashtag #KeepKidsLearning, and learn things you can prepare at http://www.summerlearning.org/. It is a perfect opportunity to sit down and read a book as part of your summer reading goals for Kids Read Now! When school starts in just over a month, you want you students to be in shape and ready to learn as if summer vacation did not exist. Players on the Penguins and the Cavaliers will be heading back to do some work in the next few weeks to get ready for the next season. Ensure the students in your school are spending some time enjoying their summer while reading and getting ready for school to begin!


By KRN Admin | Categories Educators | July 13, 2016

There has been a lot of debate lately about the importance of physical education in school curriculums. Many schools have cut PE funding or the programs have taken a back seat to “teaching the test”. The focus on raising standardized test scores has negatively affected other areas of education. Important ones. Such as Physical Education which is essential to a child’s development physically and mentally.

The National Association for Sport and Physical Education recommends 60 minutes of physical activity a day for children and adolescents. If you’ve watched professional football in the last 5 years you may have noticed a campaign called Play 60. This campaign encourages kids to get out and play for at least 60 minutes a day; using popular NFL players and kids of all ages. Besides the fact that this play or physical activity helps reduce obesity and obesity-related issues in students it helps them focus, learn and be attentive during stationary lessons. The more active, the better the academic performance.  

“Exercise directly affects the development and cognitive ability of the brain.”

Studies from the CDC, Columbia University, the New York City Health Department and Department of Education and the Universities of West Virginia, Illinois and California have all published research that supports this need for physical education in school systems. Exercise directly affects the development and cognitive ability of the brain. It positively impacts a child’s ability to learn, retain and think at a higher level. According to Active Living Research, “In some cases, more time in physical education leads to improved grades and standardized test scores.”

Besides the improved grades and brain function physical activity cultivates it also helps with a sense of social connectedness and drop-out rates. At risk students are more likely to attend class when interscholastic sports are offered. Every student, regardless of financial situation, should have access to quality education and the tools to succeed outside of the classroom. Physical education can tie all of these issues together.  

“Every student, regardless of financial situation, should have access to quality education and the tools to succeed outside of the classroom.”

During the summer months as we encourage our kids to go outside and play, swim and get dirty, we should encourage reading as well. They are exercising their bodies which helps their brain so why not support both. Kids Read Now! is like the Play 60 campaign. Both are working towards a common goal to help develop and positively influence children and adolescents. We want to give them every opportunity to succeed. Physical activity helps create eager-to-learn kids and Kids Read Now is providing the tools necessary for that success. Who knows, maybe they will begin to practice both on their own.